What determines the price of a 3d model?



  • I asked this question over at Rendo, but it's slow over there and I'd like to see some thoughts now. I've often wondered how people arrive at the price of a model they've made for Poser and DS. I look at the models for sale at Rendo, DAZ, Hivewire, and even CP and they're all about equally priced, but then you go to someplace like Turbosquid and you wonder if those people are sane when you see the prices they're trying to charge. Is there something I'm missing? Are the Turbosquid models superior in some way I'm not familiar with?



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  • Turbosquid the Royality free usage license which is included on most of those high detailed humans are
    (copied from turbosquid)

    GAMES =Console, PC, Mobile,
    VR, AR, MMO, Mods

    DIGITAL MEDIA=TV, Film, Web,
    Video, Advertising

    NEWS
    CORPORATE USE
    EDUCATION
    PRODUCT DESIGN
    3D PRINTING (limited to 5)

    basically your intentions in purchasing one of those high priced models is to make money..
    Probably the same if you ask anyone from anywhere to model something specifically for you only and you plan on making money from it.
    and you usually get different formats for max or maya usage.
    there customers are mostly businesses not casual artist or rather hobbyist.
    I thought the other way around when i first started with poser (and sometimes still do) why are they so cheap..but you can only render the image thats done we can not go on to put her/him in games and such..(without a game license)



  • Turbosquid sells some real crap. They need to raise their QA process at least to the level of Content Paradise or Poserworld, both of which are pretty near the bottom of the barrel IMO. It seems that they don't even bother to GLANCE at most of the models they sell.
    BUT, their more expensive stuff comes in multiple industry-standard file formats, often at movie/advertising media quality. It has excellent topology, commercial use licences, and may come pre-rigged. But for all that, it's ludicrously overpriced. Most of their vendors seem to be living in the world of 2000, when even basic models were a luxury, and DAZ and others were selling individual models at hundreds of dollars each. I think that there is still a lot of snobbery in the industry, but Turbosquid caters to the professional equivalent of Poser's click and pose market.
    That said, there have been times when I needed a specific obscure item for a project and I just lacked the enthusiasm or time to or references to model from scratch so I have bought at Turbosquid. I have never yet failed to be disappointed by my purchases at Turbosquid.

    As for determining the price of a model, for me the biggest factor is the amount of competition. If nobody else is offering what I do, then I will charge more. Generally, I then price at the high end of the average range.



  • @eclark1849 said in What determines the price of a 3d model?:

    I asked this question over at Rendo, but it's slow over there and I'd like to see some thoughts now. I've often wondered how people arrive at the price of a model they've made for Poser and DS. I look at the models for sale at Rendo, DAZ, Hivewire, and even CP and they're all about equally priced, but then you go to someplace like Turbosquid and you wonder if those people are sane when you see the prices they're trying to charge. Is there something I'm missing? Are the Turbosquid models superior in some way I'm not familiar with?

    Just my two coppers:

    Wherever there is competition, the market determines successful sale prices. That being said: (I wrote far too much, much more than you'd probably be willing to read. :) So.. a condensed version is needed. IF you really want me to elaborate, just ask. And, yes, this IS a condensed version... )

    TS (and similar sites) is primarily oriented towards a commercial market, where the products are part of a commercial pipeline that incorporates commercial development funding. However, part of that "deeper pockets" mentality includes the required suitability of a commercial product for actual general commercial use. Products developed for this purpose generally target multiple applications for their product, making the product appeal to a wide variety of potential consumers. Good products for such purposes have certain necessary qualities and must fulfill certain expectations.) In contrast, the Poser market is smaller and requires much more specific considerations in order to increase product appeal/suitability that are specific for their intended use as a Poser product. Some of these aspects are not of consideration for outside applications.

    A large "complaint" in the commercial marketplace coming from producers is that hobbyists are able, because they aren't necessarily concerned with making a living, to undercut professional producers in such markets, often delivering similar quality and suitability, especially with the widespread availability of cheap, professional, tools. This can sometimes drive price down and change producer behavior, making contract-work, instead of open market sales, more desirable. A professional artist is much more able to compete for work in that sort of professional, contracted, environment and that is likely where more of them will be found in the future as the market becomes increasingly saturated with hobbyist/part-time producers. (Unless, that is, market/re-seller practices/strategies change, which I don't think is very likely.) You may eventually see prices in online, general, commercial markets go down, especially in markets focused towards the "Big 3" game engines, due to the availability of tools that are of professional quality and their use by hobbyists.

    Lastly - However, the 3D market is growing, exactly for the reasons that upset some professional producers. As the market grows with more consumers, it may be that pricing dynamics will also grow, with saleable pricing schemes being forced down and sales volume becoming much more of a consideration for producers than it has been in the past.

    Very short answer: Producers of commercial products in professional 3D markets are used to "being able to eat" through their production of saleable online content. They are used to a relatively small sales volume producing a livable wage. This dynamic is rapidly changing, due to technological developments and the growth of hobbyist offerings and specialized marketplaces serving the industry. Hobbyist volume in Poser, per product, is generally larger for "professionals" in this market, even though the potential market size is smaller, so lower returns for the same work hours necessary to produce profesional-grade products are the norm in this market.

    Note: Certain products in the Poser market are not comparable to the professional 3D market, even though one may think they are. Figure Meshes, for instance, are of particular concern. In the general 3D market, there's a huge number of them. In the Poser market, due to technical and commercial concerns, that is absolutely NOT the case, as any Poser user should know. There are thousands, if not much more, of human figure objects in the general 3D world. In the Poser world, there are only a handful of saleable meshes, primarily due to technical limitations of the targeted products.



  • Artists and 3d content developers create and sell 3d for various motives. Turbosquid accommodates more freedom in this respect where stores focused on a particular platform has more restrictions as they must grow and retain the customer. Towards that end, the content stores introduce standards QA community to affect the consumer experience and sustain interest on the platform. Independent., open and/or mult-platform content stores may have less restrictions to attract more brokers and product variety.
    Also consider use licence and product exclusivity terms has much to do with value/price as artists leverage thier by diversifying thier product licensing (terms) consecutively at one or several outlets.



  • Agree with Dreamcutter. Commercial stuff is owned by the purchaser usually, to use as they see fit (other than package and redistribute as their own). As a graphic designer I was well aware that when I did work for a client I couldn't package the same product and sell it to someone else. I think a lot of the cost comes down to end user intent and freedoms/limitations, as evidenced by the extended licences for some products at Rendo. Personally I'd factor in whether it's for beer money or not, how long it will be 'interesting' in the market and how long before it get pirated.
    Of course, the fast turnover that implies kinda predicates against quality (and don't we see a lot of poor quality stuff in the market).
    My take on this (and I haven't tried to sell anything yet, but I am getting there) is that I'll make stuff I want for a scene and if I think it has commercial value (and doesn't 'borrow' resources from another creator) I'll offer it up to get 'bonus cash' for my hobby.
    BTW, I was a graphic designer, a fine artist (sculptor, illustrator, jeweller and calligrapher) and a qualified gallery director, so I'm aware of the vagaries of pricing.


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