Ploughed Field Material



  • Hello again folks,

    I'm curious to know if there's a way to take a tiling soil image and use Poser's material room to create a ploughed look to it, using displacement.

    Here is the image I have to use: 0_1486157291550_10322.jpg

    And here is the result I'm after (or close to it and minus the stubble): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a9/Furrows,_ploughed_field.jpg

    Failing that, perhaps making a freshly tilled look such as this would be easier: http://previews.123rf.com/images/grigory_bruev/grigory_bruev1310/grigory_bruev131000022/23010604-Background-of-newly-plowed-field-ready-for-new-crops-Ploughed-field-in-autumn-Farm-agricultural-back-Stock-Photo.jpg

    If I go for the latter, I'd love to be able to use the Hivewire footsteps tool.

    As far as possible, I want to avoid making lots of maps in Photoshop and use Poser's material room for as much as I can.

    I'll get to work on some ideas and post the results.



  • I may be getting somewhere with the smoother, 'tilled' look. Results will follow, if they're good enough. :)


  • Poser Ambassadors

    How's this?

    0_1486160820758_plowfar.jpg

    Unfortunately when I try to break up the ground to be "chunky" I get tears in the mesh. You can see some gray streaks because of this.

    0_1486160861391_plownear.jpg

    I tried uploading the shader but the site said "You do not have enough privileges for that". Cool.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    So here's a screen shot.

    0_1486161199912_upload-f77bea48-4b84-4242-b041-27ed20ae4332


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Note. The size of your UV map will need to be taken into account. The U_Scale and V_Scale are connected to a math node that divides the map into 50 copies on a side. If you need more or less, adjust that 50.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    The furrows I made using the P node which gives world coordinates, so they should come out the same size on any prop.

    I used the X dimension to make them parallel to Z by putting .3 in the P.x parameter.

    If you want the furrows parallel to X, move the .3 into P.z parameter. Other angles are possible by a suitable mixture of X and Z.

    You can adjust the furrow width by changing the .5 in the Math:Sin node.

    You can adjust the furrow deviation from straight by adjusting the Math_Functions_5 Value_2 which is currently 16.



  • That's awesome, thank you very much! I thought I was mostly done with mine, but it's being a pain. It's much simpler, but it's also pretty rubbish in comparison.

    I did create a normal map for the soil though, here it is:

    0_1486161891978_NormalMap.png

    I'll have a go with this one of yours, thank you very much indeed! ^_^


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Have at it!

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong."

    H. L. Mencken

    The quote is slightly incorrect - he didn't quite say it that way, but I like it.



  • Cheers! I upvoted your posts to help get you to the level where you can upload materials. I mean, if anyone should have the freedom to upload materials, it's you, lol!



  • Very nice! One could even add procedurals to make it look "watered" or even "dry" out the topsoil at the peaks, shading it a little lighter, perhaps?

    (Upvoted as well, 'cause we need a haven for great shader uploads and the threads that explain them! My respects to the demise of the Node Cult. :( )



  • @Glen85 How did you create that normal map from the photo, or is it generated by a texture program?



  • @matb said in Ploughed Field Material:

    @Glen85 How did you create that normal map from the photo, or is it generated by a texture program?

    PS or even GIMP, probably, can create normal maps from textures. (Especially with the NVidia plugins.) XNormal can also create normal maps from 3D objects. GIMP/Xnormal are free. There are probably several freebie small-footprint "from texture" generators out there. (I only ever use them from hi-def geometry sculpts for low-d figures.)


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @morkonan said in Ploughed Field Material:

    @matb said in Ploughed Field Material:

    @Glen85 How did you create that normal map from the photo, or is it generated by a texture program?

    PS or even GIMP, probably, can create normal maps from textures. (Especially with the NVidia plugins.) XNormal can also create normal maps from 3D objects. GIMP/Xnormal are free. There are probably several freebie small-footprint "from texture" generators out there. (I only ever use them from hi-def geometry sculpts for low-d figures.)

    And not to forget the B2M from Allegorithmic. ;)



  • @morkonan So these are never going to be as good as textures derived from 3D geometry because they're only accurate in two dimensions is that correct?


  • Poser Ambassadors

    The normals extracted from a color map are never as good as textures derived from 3D << yes

    because they're only accurate in two dimensions << no

    It's because "photo" color alone cannot indicate surface normal. Consider an M&M candy. The white lettering is always picked up in a conversion to normals, and yet there's no modulation related to the white lettering AT ALL in the original object.



  • I created it here after realising that my demo version of the software 'Crazybump' had expired. :)

    cpetry.github.io/NormalMap-Online



  • @bagginsbill said in Ploughed Field Material:

    It's because "photo" color alone cannot indicate surface normal. Consider an M&M candy. The white lettering is always picked up in a conversion to normals, and yet there's no modulation related to the white lettering AT ALL in the original object.

    Thanks but I don't understand what you mean by modulation here.



  • @matb said in Ploughed Field Material:

    Thanks but I don't understand what you mean by modulation here.

    Not proposing to answer for BB, btw.

    In short - The white lettering is only a color on the surface of the M&M. But, the conversion of that texture map to a normal map would result in those letters deforming the surface. (Just like in a Bump Map conversion.) In the construction of a 3D, geometrically-based, normal map for an M&M... (Not quite sure why anyone would, but..) this could not happen, since the normal map would truly represent the intended surface features of the object, regardless of any "texture" features.

    PS- In further news, on-topic only if one frequently makes cognitive associations like I do..., Science Daily - Substantial Evidence for Holographic Universe

    I find this exciting. An analogy - What 3D artists do on a 2D screen is somewhat analogous to what the Universe does to us every darn day - LIE! :) (I'm a Susskind fan, what can I say?) It's not quite, exactly, pushing into the "simulation argument", but it certainly deals directly with some quirks of information theory.

    Now, if we can harness this knowledge for our own uses... Welcome to the next-gen of Virtual Reality. :)


  • Poser Ambassadors

    I use Genetica 4 Studio to make asymmetrical seamless tiles and associated height and/or normal maps. I only now noticed that it can export normal maps with the Y dimension conforming to either the DivX (MikkT, for Cycles/Superfly) or OpenGL (tangent space, for Firefly) standard.
    For some materials, I can also generate height maps.
    0_1486259182073_Genetica 4 Studio - normal map options.png


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @seachnasaigh - AFAIK, inverting the Y (green) channel determines whether the normal map is in DirectX (X+Y-Z+) format or OpenGL (X+Y+Z+) format tangent space normal map (both of which Poser can use).

    MikkT is tangent basis which is not the same thing as tangent space. As far as I can gather, the tangent basis is like the instructions for encoding and decoding a tangent space map - so if the app that encodes the normal uses MikkT & Superfly decodes that map with MikkT, the result will be as expected.

    MikkT is used in a lot of apps now as the source code was provided by Mikkelsen for free. There's more info on the Blender site here too in case anyone's interested ;)

    Bottom line IMHO - if in doubt, use a height map :D


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