Substance Painter 20% off



  • We made a limited time deal to get you Substance Painter 2 for 20% off. Sale ends tonight!


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Got it, thanks :)


  • Poser Ambassadors

    I bought it as well.
    I did run into a small issue thou.
    My trial had just expired, and I had to use the Activate thru account option.
    Just telling it where the key is apparently does not work once it is expired.

    No biggy thou, it works fine now.



  • @shvrdavid said in Substance Painter 20% off:

    I bought it as well.
    I did run into a small issue thou.
    My trial had just expired, and I had to use the Activate thru account option.
    Just telling it where the key is apparently does not work once it is expired.

    No biggy thou, it works fine now.

    Have you played with it much yet? What are your thoughts on using it to create shaders for Poser?


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @mr_phoenyxx

    It is a bit slow on my notebook, but it does work other than that. From what I can tell from using the trial and now the retail version, you can basically make texture sets for any render engine you want too. I am sure if you have a decent GPU you would not see any of the slowdowns or texture limits that I get on my notebook (Gtx765m 2 gig dedicated memory, IE: nerfed GTX card)



  • @shvrdavid said in Substance Painter 20% off:

    @mr_phoenyxx

    It is a bit slow on my notebook, but it does work other than that. From what I can tell from using the trial and now the retail version, you can basically make texture sets for any render engine you want too. I am sure if you have a decent GPU you would not see any of the slowdowns or texture limits that I get on my notebook (Gtx765m 2 gig dedicated memory, IE: nerfed GTX card)

    Thanks! I am mostly interested in how it works specifically with Poser. How do the maps translate? Does the roughness map end up in the specular channel? Do the bump and normal maps work? How does the final product render in Poser? Does it only work with Superfly, which is my impression since it says it's a tool for PBRs?

    I appreciate anything you can add.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @mr_phoenyxx

    The easiest way to answer that, is simply it depends on how you set it up and what you are after.
    Yes it is designed for painting PBR texture sets, but it is not limited to that by any means.
    You can make maps for other render engines, based on how you set it up and how you go about painting them.
    As an example: I have Pauline set up here for SuperFly, with the default maps assigned to a fill layer.
    Basically this is a blank slate to go from, using the SM Pauline Resource textures as a start.

    Substance Painter Screen Shot

    The area I have outlined in Green are the maps that I have assigned to be processed and included while painting.
    The area in Red is available channels to add to the mix.

    If all you are after is making, diffuse, bump, trans maps, etc. I don't see why you could not do it in Substance Painter.
    I have run into a few snags with the program, and most of it is from me not knowing it real well yet.
    That part will straiten itself out in time.



  • Is that the interface? Kinda looks like Studio.



  • @mr_phoenyxx said in Substance Painter 20% off:

    @shvrdavid said in Substance Painter 20% off:

    @mr_phoenyxx

    It is a bit slow on my notebook, but it does work other than that. From what I can tell from using the trial and now the retail version, you can basically make texture sets for any render engine you want too. I am sure if you have a decent GPU you would not see any of the slowdowns or texture limits that I get on my notebook (Gtx765m 2 gig dedicated memory, IE: nerfed GTX card)

    Thanks! I am mostly interested in how it works specifically with Poser. How do the maps translate? Does the roughness map end up in the specular channel? Do the bump and normal maps work? How does the final product render in Poser? Does it only work with Superfly, which is my impression since it says it's a tool for PBRs?

    I appreciate anything you can add.

    My suggestion is to use it with the Physical Root node if you're exporting maps. You don't HAVE to do it that way but I find it's the easiest workflow. You export your maps from either Substance Painter or Substance Designer and then import them into Poser and attach them to the corresponding channels in the Physical Root node.

    I prefer using a metalness/metallic workflow, so I usually only have four maps in Poser: the Albedo/Base Color (previously known as diffuse map). The Roughness map, the Metallic Map, and the Normal Map. You can, of course, add additional maps if you want or need but I find these four get the job done pretty well.



  • Here's a render comparison.

    0_1463017740519_compare.png

    In this case, both scenes were rendered only with a single HDRI image no extra lights. The HDRI is one I found of a bathroom on episcura.com unfortunately I don't know how to increase the exposure of an HDRI in Poser so I had to leave it at the lower light inital setting in Substance Painter so you can see the similarity in material quality.

    0_1463018235394_mat.png

    0_1463018298490_background-setting.png

    One of the benefits of Substance tools and tools like Quixel Suite is that you can define multiple material types on a single material. So for my model, I had one material: Bathtub but my texture maps from Substance describes several materials for that : marble, plastic, brass, porcelain, and steel. Handy, though if you're making content for others, you'll probably want to still break up your model to multiple actual materials to allow for user variability.

    Hope that made sense.



  • Thanks you two! That made a lot of sense to me. :)