Poser 11 SR7 is available



  • @erogenesis SR 8 is the only update I used.



  • @ghostship said in Poser 11 SR7 is available:

    @erogenesis do you ever sleep?

    sleep? what is this sleep you speak of?

    @eclark1849 said in Poser 11 SR7 is available:

    @erogenesis SR 8 is the only update I used.

    is it legal to send a friend an older SR? :D



  • @eclark1849 said in Poser 11 SR7 is available:

    I'm not updating anymore. My Poser Pro 11 was working fine until I updated with SR8, Now all it does is give me trouble. Crashes, Dawn keeps disappearing, etc. How do i get back to the last version i had on this Windows 7 machine?

    You can usually use system restore to restore Windows 7 and apps back to a previous state. Windows 10 has that feature too, but for some odd reason it's disabled by default and every major update disables it again. :/



  • @semicharm Thanks. I'll give it a try.



  • @eclark1849 Yeah, I don't think that one's gonna work either I think it's been too long. My computer has had at least three updates since just after Poser was updated. I used to be able to keep upgrade files on my Mac, but i haven't been able to figure out where or if there is a copy of the update or a previous version of Poser on my laptop.



  • @eclark1849

    @eclark1849 said in Poser 11 SR7 is available:

    @eclark1849 Yeah, I don't think that one's gonna work either I think it's been too long. My computer has had at least three updates since just after Poser was updated. I used to be able to keep upgrade files on my Mac, but i haven't been able to figure out where or if there is a copy of the update or a previous version of Poser on my laptop.

    I think by default it only shows the most recent restore point, but there's an option to view all previous restore points currently available.

    As for Poser updates, there's a setting in download manager to keep a set number of previous versions and to change the download location. Personally, I copy them myself from that folder for safe keeping. In your case, I'd check the current download setting and browse to that folder. Then, right-click it and select "properties". Select the "previous versions" tab and see if there's a copy from before the new SR was downloaded. If so, you can open that past version of the folder and retrieve the old update.

    Good luck! And yes, in a past life I was an IT consultant.


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    @eclark1849

    Hi,
    I have no clue what you guys do with your PC/Mac/ configurations and or installations.

    All my systems are Windows10-64bit and between 6 and 16 GB RAM.
    Some have Nvidea others run on AMD cards. Some run on SSD others on HD.

    Poser runs about 24/7/365 here on one but mostly 2 to 3 PC's, sometimes 4.

    Every W-End, (sometimes less, sometimes more) we install and run a new beta.

    There are only 2 ways I can get PoserPro11 to crash:

    • Run the script "Delete all lights" when I accidently have a light selected.
    • Run a fitting room session on a figure that has dynamic hair on her.

    And God knows I abuse Poser more and harder each and every day.
    Except for the above cases, It has been months since my latest "normal" crash.

    Figures and new obj files/textures combinations run in and out with the front and back door open, but, and here comes the "but": LOL.

    I maintain a DEFAULT installation.
    NO scripts and NO add-ons to spoil the Poser experience.

    I absolutely REFUSE to run ANY 3"'rd party script while Poser is running.

    (Sometimes I test scripts, but like all others test ? When the testing is done? Out they go.) => I wannna see what "Poser does".

    To live happy-happy, all you need is a "default Poser installation", and something like Blender to do the obj file work, and something like Krita to do the texture work.

    The last time a figure vanished from screen must have been more then 5 years ago but (LOL the second "but") I can get obj to vaporise. LOL. Textures to depart on unbooked flights, weight and bulge maps to go banana's, but that's part of what "I" do while testing. LOL.

    When "real life calms down", I"ll show what I have been doing.

    You all know V4, right?
    Want to change the texture set? => Single click here.
    No scripts but pure and simple obj and texture work, and using Poser to get it to work properly. And the procedure works on ALL Poser figures/clothing, whatever, renders faster too, and with far better rendered results in ALL render engines.

    Ha-ha-ha-, I call it the RMZSSK procedure. LOL. More to come on that one. LOL.



  • @vilters I have seen two types of malfunction in Poser. First, if you turn up the graphics just a bit too much, the SuperFly process will get wedged. It's an easy fix, start a terminal and kill the subprocess running the render. The second has to do with the mouse. There is a danger zone near the edge of the screen, which is oddly enough where the menus are located. Sometimes, the mouse will send off a weird event, and poof. Doesn't appear to be OS related, I had the same features on my Vista PC and now my Mac Mini (got tired of virus scans and the interminable daily reloads of the entire operating system, so no more Windows, ever). Otherwise, Poser is pretty stable for me.



  • @vilters Here's the thing. I've always used Poser on my Mac. If anything went wrong with it, and it rarely did, I could fix it. And I always knew where the files were because I knew where everything was on my Mac. Now, I'm running Windows 7 on a Dell Laptop. I've been running Poser on a Mac since version 2. This is the first time I've ever had to use a PC to run Poser. It took me a couple of months to figure out where the new content I buy goes. Add to that that i was quite happy with the way PP11 was running. It wasn't giving me any fits or anything. SR 8 was the first update I installed since I bought the program about a year ago. But yeah, ever since I updated, Dawn keeps taking a powder any time she gets a mind to, and now Poser either crashes or hangs, depending on what I'm trying to do, and that's mostly rendering with Superfly or trying to run a sim in the Cloth Room.



  • @eclark1849 We have to take step back into yesteryear to understand the mess that is the PC. In the beginning of time, you could only see 640K of the first 1MB of RAM on a PC, the rest was just ignored. Then, one day IBM thought it was a good idea to add a chip that would redirect memory access to this upper region into the peripherals to speed things up. This is the point where I would like to travel back in time and say "Nooooooo!!!!" Things worked pretty well, because they had complete control of mapping in this upper region. A side effect of this control was that they did not build in any, and I mean ANY, way for the cards to communicate with the communications controller. Nothing. As long as IBM had complete control all was well. Then, they lost control. It was now possible to initialize your network card, and have the hard drive reformat itself. What a mess. To add insult to injury, people started loading hardware drivers into the upper memory regions, which sometimes were loaded into the graphics card by mistake. There was no way to fix this, for as you recall there is NO way for each card to register memory use (no out of band signalling). Eventually, Microsoft forced people to stop loading drivers in this upper area, but the cards still unfortunately, suffer from this early disaster.

    In a nutshell, graphics are hard, and it's not always the software's fault...



  • @tburzio
    PC memory architecture has changed since then, specially in 64bit versions.



  • @semicharm No, not in this important respect. Intel likes to let you think it has, but it still has this problem. In fact, they went to a great deal of trouble to make you think it had. This is why Apple is about to finally dump the whole x86 architecture and use their ARM chips.



  • Did you know that some people are unaware that the cause of the common computer virus is the removal of the length of the executable from the executable header in the early days of Windows? This is called a cavitation virus, because you can confuse the link loader by adding a second program in the excess allocated file space on the hard drive, or cavity. Yeah, it's really that simple, but a complete mythology has grown up over the years to try and explain something so simple. Microsoft knows.



  • @tburzio
    PCs have different operating modes for compatibility. Most of them are likely to be abandoned after legacy BIOS and DOS support are finally dropped.

    And no, Macs are unlikely to make that transition again. At least if they're smart and care about retaining their remaining user base. ARM processors have come a long way, but there's no way they'll be able handle x64 Mac apps through emulation with acceptable performance or head on with an actual ARM port against the original x64 version.



  • @tburzio

    Microsoft has a weird habit since a long time: one version on two is to avoid at any price.
    Example of those: WinMe, Vista, Win8.xx
    Most of the time, these versions don't handle correctly the PC's resources when it's a little too much overloaded, for example with programs such as Poser.



  • @tburzio said in Poser 11 SR7 is available:

    @eclark1849 We have to take step back into yesteryear to understand the mess that is the PC. In the beginning of time, you could only see 640K of the first 1MB of RAM on a PC, the rest was just ignored. Then, one day IBM thought it was a good idea to add a chip that would redirect memory access to this upper region into the peripherals to speed things up. This is the point where I would like to travel back in time and say "Nooooooo!!!!" Things worked pretty well, because they had complete control of mapping in this upper region. A side effect of this control was that they did not build in any, and I mean ANY, way for the cards to communicate with the communications controller. Nothing. As long as IBM had complete control all was well. Then, they lost control. It was now possible to initialize your network card, and have the hard drive reformat itself. What a mess. To add insult to injury, people started loading hardware drivers into the upper memory regions, which sometimes were loaded into the graphics card by mistake. There was no way to fix this, for as you recall there is NO way for each card to register memory use (no out of band signalling). Eventually, Microsoft forced people to stop loading drivers in this upper area, but the cards still unfortunately, suffer from this early disaster.

    In a nutshell, graphics are hard, and it's not always the software's fault...

    This reminds me of the time of 386^Max and Qemm...


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    @tburzio

    With some figures, that load a TON of 4K textures like diffuse, spec, bump, normal, displacement, transmaps, times the number of material zones, it is easy to get to the max RAM limit, or the max limit of any video card.

    I forgot : Times the number of figures in your scene.. LOL.

    As you can calculate:
    There are a LOT of 4K textures to load and manage, and that's even BEFORE doing the calculations start what all the nodes are asking for in the material room.

    It is like a car, overload or overspeed it, and you run into problems.

    For FireFly, we only had RAM limitations, now for SuperFly, we also have card limitations.

    Ha-, this is the area where RMZSSK comes in. LOL.
    Translated it means: BTB and KISS and get a better result in the process.



  • @tburzio If that ever was such a thing as a "cavitation virus", google can't find any reference to it and would be defeated by a checksum and other security measures.



  • @Y-Phil Yeah, it usually takes another version to fix the problems created by the previous one, then the next will change a bunch of things and start the cycle again. :/ Microsoft has basically made their users open "beta" testers for decades.



  • @semicharm Well, as i said , PP11 either hangs or crashes when I'm using the Cloth room or rendering. Except when i'm using Cycles shader nodes. Then it renders fast as crap through a goose!

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