Photographing/scanning textures for bump/displacement/transparency maps.



  • Vicky Fourpointtwoplusplus has put her foot down and insisted that I get off my butt and make her a proper bridal gown so that she can finally get married and become an honest(?) woman. I've been fiddling with this idea for years (maybe decades) and have gone so far as to buy a few gowns off Ebay to use as examples. She just loves those outrageously ornate gowns from the late 80's and early 90's. Attached is a picture of one of the gowns I've bought. I'm a professional photographer and have the equipment to shoot the textures (or scan them) but am wondering about lighting techniques for the creation of maps (I'll be working in Poser).

    1. Would i place a dark material behind the lace to facilitate the creation of transparency maps?
    2. When photographing the embroidery and beadwork, would I light it evenly from all sides at a low angle to emphasize the detail, or does a 3D map (bump/displacement) have different requirements?
      I've read a ton of stuff on maps (with Vicky eagerly looking over my shoulder) but everything I've read talks about the techniques used in Photoshop, there's nothing about the photographic requirements.
      If it piques anyone's interest, I'll be releasing any and all images or scans to the community. Vicky and I would love to see what others would do with the textures.

    0_1501422211443_[Size 8] Private Label by G 002.JPG



  • @baginski For things to look right you DO NOT want burned in reflections, highlights, or shadows. You want the material shader nodes to do that stuff for you otherwise it just looks like a picture pasted on your model.

    So when taking your photos you need really diffuse, even lighting. You will need to have soft boxes for lighting or place your item inside of a see through white plastic tub and light it from outside the walls of the tub (the tub becomes the diffuser.)



  • @ghostship said in Photographing/scanning textures for bump/displacement/transparency maps.:

    @baginski For things to look right you DO NOT want burned in reflections, highlights, or shadows. You want the material shader nodes to do that stuff for you otherwise it just looks like a picture pasted on your model.

    So when taking your photos you need really diffuse, even lighting. You will need to have soft boxes for lighting or place your item inside of a see through white plastic tub and light it from outside the walls of the tub (the tub becomes the diffuser.)

    The point regarding the shader nodes I already knew but thanks for confirming that. Similarly, I'm more than familiar with using the plastic tub for shiny stuff. What sort of contrast ratio would be ideal? I assume I'll need enough of a contrast to allow the creation of the maps in say Photoshop, but not so much that I lose detail at both ends of the exposure?
    On a parallel diversion; I've been playing with cheap inexpensive LED string lights from China through Ebay. I use an old computer power supply to power them and can make all manner of lighting setups. They provide even lighting and by placing a wide strip of opaque plastic film in front, can create a nice diffuse light source. Hmmmmm, could be fun.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @baginski - maybe consider green screen for creating transparency maps? As @ghostship says, colour maps need to be very flat with minimal lighting detail, so keep the values towards the centre of the histogram. Maybe shoot bracketed exposures for HDR & flatten in tone mapping? Height maps would obviously need the full range. If you're making maps for Superfly, you may want to consider making roughness maps too.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to Graphics Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.