Library search - good to know (PP11)



  • Just to share a tidbit about the library. I've set it up as external, so I can have as many library tabs as I want. I use the search extensively and don't use tags. If I want to tag a folder I just create an empty subfolder with all the tags in the name. Poser will find it.

    What had me wondering though, was that sometimes right-click Locate on an item wouldn't work. Often on stuff I had created myself. So today I finally bit the bullet and figured out why.
    In some of the folders per accident I had a double (consecutive) space somewhere in the name. Apparently the Poser-Lib can't handle that, because when I cleaned the name to single spaces only, all my right-click Locates started working!
    Just thought to share if anybody else has the same behavior...
    Cheers, Bob



  • @BobM Was that one of those habits from typing school? I never learned formal typing so naturally I only single space my words. I saw some debate a while ago on the interwebs weather or not people should double space at sentence ends and wherever else is the formal spacing procedure.



  • I'm not astonished by the double-space effect as the library seem to respond to an internal web server. And HTML ignores the multiple spaces.
    Programmer speaking, lol: I have a kind of a allergy to spaces in folder/file names. I must concentrate to use one, most of the time, I'm using hyphens and underscores.



  • @ghostship Ha ha, no, just a flaky keyboard, and while I have a new one waiting, this one has those handy buttons on top to open calc etc. So, just dumbo me...



  • @Y-Phil Yeah, that's a good one, hadn't thought of that. The hyphen works now, but the first P11 build didn't eat hyphens (test 3d-age: results found= zero), so I'm conditioned off hyphens. But underscore is good.



  • @BobM

    Speaking of that: my natural language is French. And my first reflexes were to use accents in names. Poser doesn't like them, too... :D



  • @Y-Phil I've been caught with that, when I've wanted to name a folder with an accurately diacriticalled German word. I have content containing the word "Doppelgänger" that I can search for and shows up in the search results up to typing "Doppelg", but as soon as I put in the "ä", they all disappear. This needs to be fixed. If one is allowed to create content names, one should reasonably expect to be able to search for that created content. The 32 character filename limit is also anachronistic, given no such limitation exists in current operating systems. Folders created in the OS don't have this limit and the library still supports them. Content created by python scripts directly don't exhibit such a limitation and they still work in the library.



  • @ghostship said in Library search - good to know (PP11):

    @BobM Was that one of those habits from typing school? I never learned formal typing so naturally I only single space my words. I saw some debate a while ago on the interwebs weather or not people should double space at sentence ends and wherever else is the formal spacing procedure.

    Well I spent 40 years at a very large law firm, and their practice was to double space at sentence ends. Whether that's something all law firms do as a matter of course, I have no idea, but I'm so used to it, I still do it even though I left the firm 13 1/2 years ago. I even do it when typing on forums, but web pages don't recognize it, so sentences only have one space at the end. Probably an HTML protocol.

    If I were to guess, I would suspect the firm insisted we do so to make very large briefs and agreements easier to read. We also had a practice of putting 1 1/2 lines between paragraphs on double-spaced documents, which isn't done anywhere else that I know of.



  • @Miss-B double-space at sentence end is sufficiently a typing meme that Apple use it to auto-complete a period at the end of a sentence on iPhones! Youthful-nerd-me remembers learning that in a one-unit, year 11 typing course in High School I took, because it appeared to be useful to learn to touch type in the years before computers/laptops/tablets existed on every student's desk.



  • @anomalaus I learned typing on a manual typewriter back in the late 50s, and I don't think Mac or Apple existed back then, and when I got my first desktop computer, it was an IBM clone, so not really up on Apple or the Mac OS.

    Now-a-days, my cellphone and tablet are both Android, and I don't recall whether either of them automatically double space at sentence ends, though I suspect not. It's just something I got so used to doing, I couldn't automatically stop when I stopped working at the firm. I like documents to be easy to read, especially when it's single-spaced, as is everything we type on forums.



  • I learned to type on a manual typewriter... (Underwood, now a true antique, learned at age 5 :) ) Later, I took typing in High School because it was a crip class and cute girls were in it.

    It took me decades to unlearn double-spacing and I still find myself doing it purely from muscle memory.

    For directories, though, I'm a hardspace guy. Putting a space in a directory or filename is something that I rarely find myself being able to do. I still feel that the computer is going to cough up blood and die if there's a blank space.



  • @anomalaus said in Library search - good to know (PP11):

    @Miss-B double-space at sentence end is sufficiently a typing meme that Apple use it to auto-complete a period at the end of a sentence on iPhones! Youthful-nerd-me remembers learning that in a one-unit, year 11 typing course in High School I took, because it appeared to be useful to learn to touch type in the years before computers/laptops/tablets existed on every student's desk.

    Double spacing at the end of a sentence is a holdover from manual typewriters. The characters were all monospaced back then. An "i" took up the same amount of space as a "m", so it made sense to double space at the end of a sentence for readability. Today's digital fonts are mostly proportional, they're kerned to fit together according to their actual width. Monospaced fonts still exist and are used sometimes to represent code or so numbers align in accounting software. It's best not to double space these days. Your typesetter with thank you.



  • @dcrosby said in Library search - good to know (PP11):

    Double spacing at the end of a sentence is a holdover from manual typewriters. The characters were all monospaced back then. An "i" took up the same amount of space as a "m", so it made sense to double space at the end of a sentence for readability. Today's digital fonts are mostly proportional, they're kerned to fit together according to their actual width. Monospaced fonts still exist and are used sometimes to represent code or so numbers align in accounting software. It's best not to double space these days. Your typesetter with thank you.

    EXACTLY!! Back in the days of DOS based computers, the firm's court documents were typed with Courier. Once the firm switched to Windows, all the document templates were switched to Times New Roman, but a habit is still a habit. If you're used to typing a double space at sentence end, it didn't matter what font was in use.


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