The Rule of Thirds



  • According to Wikipedia:
    The rule of thirds is applied by aligning a subject with the guide lines and their intersection points, placing the horizon on the top or bottom line, or allowing linear features in the image to flow from section to section.

    Here's a hack by attaching two cubes to the camera to see where the intersection points are in a scene:

    0_1504212103481_3rds.jpg

    Problem is that when the Focal value of the camera is changed, the cubes move away.

    Is there a way to attach these cubes to the Focus Distance Guide (FDG)? Or change the FDG so that it has these lines full screen at a certain distance?
    It would be nice to have it around only when needed, instead of loading a pict of it in the background or something.

    Thanks!



  • @krios One of the things I liked when working in DS 3A and DS 4.0 Pro. Dreamlight had created an add-on for just such a purpose called Render Camera Pointer. It would certainly be nice if Poser had such an add-on as well.



  • Hmm...

    Not sure if I've understood your question correctly. Bloody late here too, so please forgive me if I'm just writing some BS.

    Did you try to attach the cube to your figures' BODY actor?
    This should at least eliminate the problem with changing focal length because the cube will be parented to the figure, regardless of the camera focus or zoom.

    Please correct me if I'm wrong!

    Karina


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    The Focus Distance Guide is geometry, you can find it in the default Poser 11 Content - Runtime/Geometries/Camera/camtarget (obz = zipped obj). So possible to backup the original file & substitute your own ...



  • Looks interesting. I've been using this, you just import them to your background and use as guides. https://www.renderosity.com/mod/bcs/?ViewProduct=69084



  • @kalypso Yes, the Render Camera Pointer I use in DS had overlays, including the Fibonacci, or Golden, Circle.



  • @Miss-B said in The Rule of Thirds:

    It would certainly be nice if Poser had such an add-on as well.

    Second that!


    @karina said in The Rule of Thirds:

    Did you try to attach the cube to your figures' BODY actor?

    The trick, Karina, is to attach it to the camera, which is just a prop and has no body... I don't think.


    @kalypso said in The Rule of Thirds:

    Looks interesting. I've been using this, you just import them to your background and use as guides. https://www.renderosity.com/mod/bcs/?ViewProduct=69084

    Maybe we can figure that out next :]



  • @caisson said in The Rule of Thirds:

    The Focus Distance Guide is geometry, you can find it in the default Poser 11 Content - Runtime/Geometries/Camera/camtarget (obz = zipped obj).

    Thank you very much for the tip Caisson!
    It works like a charm! 2 in 1, check the thirds and measure DOF!


    0_1504236971872_DOF1.jpg

    0_1504236976495_DOF2.jpg


    Those who are interested in this little hack, can get it from deviantART (too many hoops to hop through to share it on renderosity... for now)



  • I 'solved' this by making a transparency texture with four lines (and a border) and applying that to a basic Poser Square Hi-Res prop. Since I pretty much always use a 3:2 aspect ratio I sized up the prop to 150% on the X-scale. I parented this prop to a Dolly Camera and X-rotated it 90 degrees to get it to be right in front of the camera. Then depending on the Focal Length I can easily move the prop along the Z-axis to fill the frame with a Rule of Thirds overlay. When it comes to rendering (or when I no longer need it) I can just disable that prop.

    The benefit being that I can have it 'on' as long as I like, which I don't think is possible with adjusting the focus-distance object.



  • @adosity said in The Rule of Thirds:

    The benefit being that I can have it 'on' as long as I like, which I don't think is possible with adjusting the focus-distance object.

    Not a problem Adosity, the focus-distance can be turned on or off: Menu -> Display -> Guides -> Focus Distance Guide
    The thing about putting an object in front of the camera is that it's easier to select it then stuff in the scene.