This Bucket size thing, can it go?



  • A question on this:

    Wouldn't it be fairly simple to develop a script that would read the hardware environment and offer a "suggestion" concerning these sorts of hardware-specific render settings that so often confuse new or even experienced users? (Granted, it may need permissions, but most have already given the parent process those.)



  • @morkonan I think that it matters what's in the scene as well. too many textures or hair transparencies will make a GPU render stop but I think if you make the buckets small enough it will go though. This is why you can't have a script that figures it out for you: Too many variables. For super fly I use either 256 or 384 for a bucket size depending on what is in the scene. This will be different for different computers.



  • What I am trying to say is that, as CPUs become more powerful and provided you have entered the number of processors/cores in the Number of Threads field, Maximum Bucket Size becomes increasingly irrelevant.

    Two CPU processors, each with four cores = eight cores. Enter 8 in the Number of Threads field and have a glass of wine. Given sufficient RAM memory, you needn't even think about bucket size.

    Maximum Bucket Size is becoming meaningful only to slobs who have single core processors and six GBs of RAM. Slobs like me! Because we haven't got muscular CPU resources, we should/must lower the bucket size to improve our render times.

    Note Bene: Erogenesis says he uses a bucket size of 1024. That's effin' gigantic! He's rendering scenes (whatever their absolute vertical & horizontal dimensions) in 1024x1024 pixel blocks! Obviously, he has a system that can handle that load. If I tried that bucket size (again, whatever the absolute dimensions), Poser would hang when I tried to render even an uncomplicated two-character scene. I haven't got the resources for so large a bucket size. Therefore, when the scene is complicated and Poser doesn't render as quickly as I wish or simply hangs when I try to render, I lower the bucket size.

    Of course, if you have a monster CPU and you are rendering your version of Bosch's 'The Garden of Earthly Delights' at dimensions of 36 x 36 inches with a resolution of 300 ppi, you probably want to think about bucket size.



  • @ghostship said in This Bucket size thing, can it go?:

    @morkonan I think that it matters what's in the scene as well. too many textures or hair transparencies will make a GPU render stop but I think if you make the buckets small enough it will go though. This is why you can't have a script that figures it out for you: Too many variables. For super fly I use either 256 or 384 for a bucket size depending on what is in the scene. This will be different for different computers.

    But, if it could read the scene, first? Either read it directly or read a saved scene file with the same name?

    I guess what I'm saying is that as long as we know what the standards would be and can get the information from the program, a script that would give a suggestion as to render settings would be... extremely helpful. One that worked in conjunction with D3D's excellent render settings would be ideal, of course.

    It'd clear up about half the questions regarding generic optimization of render settings on forums across the galaxy... :)