Needing help with Which software should I buy? Thank you



  • Dear All

    Please give me some suggestions. I am trying to tell a story on youtube using animation or/and stills with voiceover. And also wanting to do a meditation tutorial video.
    But I don’t want to draw the characters over and over again.
    I just purchased poser pro 11. Waiting for it to arrive.
    Can you please tell me is this all I need to accomplish the task?
    Should I buy moho and import poser figures and pose them?
    Or which other software should I buy.
    Really new to this. Any advice would help.
    Thank you very much.

    P.s.I alreay bought the tutorial videos.

    Best Regards, Karin



  • Don't rush your decision. Learn Poser before you decide whether you need something more.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Hi Karin,
    You will find some nice people here that will be open to help.

    I use Poser since version one, and my main softwares are:

    • PoserPro11
    • Blender (free) to create clothing and props
    • Krita (free) as a paint app

    Basically, you don't need anything more.

    For some tips and tricks, please look at my 7 video tutorial series on YouTube under "Poser2Blender2Poser".

    Best regards, and feel free to ask. Tony



  • The softwares you need really depend on the quality you're looking for. At beginner's level I'd really recommend free, easy softwares that you don't have to spend weeks learning.

    Highly recommend SketchUp for props and structures. It's so easy to use! Go for the free version, it's fully workable, no need to spend $$$ in the paid version.

    Once you have a prop, you may need a texture. I'd say to avoid textures and just use solid colors for props if you're looking at something introductory, because realistic, professional-looking textures are an art on itself. I use simple, rather abstract props in animations, but then that's because I like do them in an anime-kind of style. If you decide to develop textures for your props, it really depends on the style you're comfortable for drawing:

    (a) for bitmap drawing there are a ton of programs all over the place; the market is over-crowded; I use Serif PhotoPlus Starter just because it's free and it has enough functionality for me -- but if you ask 20 folks you may get 20 answers here.

    (b) for vector drawing (for repetitive or geometric patterns) I really recommend Inkscape; it's very cool and it's free.

    For clothing you're very well served with Marvelous Designer. It's super-expensive, but if you are serious about animation this is really the best tool in the market for designing clothes. Best $600 I ever spent! If you only need a couple of clothes then you're better served looking at Renderosity for free clothes (they have hundreds there) or Content Paradise for paid clothes.

    For compositing with real life videos or multiple animations, and for voice over I can't recommend; I used to use Sony SoundForge long ago, but nowadays I don't use any of that. Blender may be a viable option for compositing, I dunno.



  • @vilters "Blender (free) to create clothing and props"

    Blender for audio/video compositing; and special effects—like rendered candle flames... using either particle systems, or even just color keyed video of a lit candle-flame.

    It's shocking what can be done with Blender:
    link text
    *This image is a link.

    In the Smith Micro catalog, there is also Motion Artist. It was designed for motion-comics, and allows for compositing audio.



  • Thank you so much for the replies. There are so many softwares out there. I am kind of unsure of where to spend my time ,energy and money on. I will start trying blender and the other softwares mentioned. I also heard about daz studio and Iclone but since I have poser already, I probably don’t need them anymore. But out of curiosity, can you please tell me whats the difference between them? Maya and 3dmax is probably too difficult and expensive for me to start with. By the way, I already have photoshop and illustrator installed, do you think that would work with doing animation? 😀



  • @karin
    Photoshop will be of immense help with any of the other tools; Illustrator too. Blender can import the PSD format natively; and can import SVG or DXF files exported from Illustrator... as well as most images.

    Blender basics:

    Blender basic animations:



  • Good day to the kind people replying.
    How are you all doing?
    After reading the posts and doing more research. Things started to be more clear.
    From what I saw on the internet, there are alot of people talking about poser as a good software for stills but not for animation. Does that mean I should export my poser poses or animation to blender to animate? But is blender hard to use? Forgive me for asking naive/ stupid questions.



  • @karin said in Needing help with Which software should I buy? Thank you:
    But is blender hard to use?

    Yes, it's terrifyingly complicated....if you open it up and look at the eight ba-zillion buttons, knobs, and dials. It's like an airplane's cockpit. Thankfully you don't have to eat it all in one mouthful. Open it up, take a deep breath and just do one little thing. Follow a lesson on the interface and play with the different pallets, deleting the ones you won't use. Load a simple box and screw around with it. Be careful of all the damned shortcuts (hotkeys). It seems like (almost) everyone making tutorials only uses Blender and therefore have all the sixty eleventeen hotkeys burned into their brains. I'm normal and use a lot of different programs, so I generally use the menus. It's a tad slower but frees me from the anxiety of worrying about stupid shortcuts. I've been using Blender for years but still only use a teeny-weeny, itsy-bitsy part of it's capability.



  • @karin said in Needing help with Which software should I buy? Thank you:

    Good day to the kind people replying.
    How are you all doing?
    After reading the posts and doing more research. Things started to be more clear.
    From what I saw on the internet, there are alot of people talking about poser as a good software for stills but not for animation. Does that mean I should export my poser poses or animation to blender to animate? But is blender hard to use? Forgive me for asking naive/ stupid questions.

    I see exactly as the opposite. All that I do in Poser is animation, and the reason why I do that in Poser and not Blender or DAZ Studio is that I find Poser incredibly easy to use for animation.

    I suspect someone that spends the time to learn the humongous amount of hotkeys in Blender might find it easy too, but I don't think that at all. I always forget which hotkey does what, and then I usually can't find what I'm looking for in normal menus (too many of them), plus it irritates me immensely that the menus change depending on what you have selected and which mode you have selected. I tried to use Blender several times, but usually I end up frustrated with it -- but then again

    The thing with DAZ is that I think it's very hard to make complex animations. The animation interface (at least last time I checked) was too simplistic. Maybe it has improved (they are always improving it), but it didn't meet my needs.

    Now, one software you should take a look at is iClone; it does promise superior animation, and it has some very, very impressive tools, but it is very expensive, and doesn't have the amount of ready assets (toons, etc) that Poser has.

    So for those reasons I believe that Poser is still a superior animation tool at this moment. But it has been pretty much stale for several releases now, so I hope that SM takes that seriously and will provide some useful improvements in the next release.



  • @fbs7

    Hmm.. didn't complete my thoughts on Blender... "but then again someone that has better memory than me will be really blessed with the huge amount of functionality that Blender has - from liquid simulation to particles to metaballs to you name it, Blender has it, and you can use it all in animations. It's really a pity that's so cumbersome to use."



  • @baginski Don't scare her, baginski. The hardest thing about Blender is learning where everything is and how they work. That takes practice. Once you learn your way around, you'll wonder what took you so long to figure it out. I do however, concur that Blender's interface is very intimidating for first time users.



  • Youtube does have a trove of Blender tutorials; and there are several forums where Blender users are glad to answer questions.



  • @mechanaut I also have a growing post on the Using 3D Software > Blender forum at HiveWire, where, when I have a few minutes, I keep adding links to Blender Help, Forums and Tutorials. I started it a few years ago on another forum, and added it to the HiveWire Blender forum so folks can find good Blender resources.



  • @eclark1849 said in Needing help with Which software should I buy? Thank you:

    @baginski Don't scare her, baginski. The hardest thing about Blender is learning where everything is and how they work. That takes practice. Once you learn your way around, you'll wonder what took you so long to figure it out. I do however, concur that Blender's interface is very intimidating for first time users.

    ... and 1000th time users that are running out of neurons, me included... :-(



  • @eclark1849 said in Needing help with Which software should I buy? Thank you:

    @baginski Don't scare her, baginski.

    I wasn't trying too, but I may have given that impression. My point is that Blender IS crazy complicated but you don't need to learn it all at once, or even most of it. I've never used most of Blender's capabilities. I just build models and ignore everything else. I have my one-and-holy arrangement of pallets so that it always looks the same and I generally just use the menus. I have a paper cheatsheet on the corner of one monitor for the hotkeys I do use but that's it.
    I kind of see it like life....just use the important stuff and ignore everything else for a simple and fulfilling life.



  • @karin I would suggest that you learn how to use Poser to animate before moving on to animation in a third party program. No matter which program you use, animating Poser figures outside Poser adds an order of magnitude it terms of complexity, with bones, rigging, kinematics, deformation, etc - all of which refer to SETTING UP the figures before you even start actually animating. This has been done for you in Poser's off the shelf figures.

    There are definitely limitations to Poser's animation, but until you hit them, there's no point moving to another system that will take 5 times as long to learn. The greatest limitation in Poser is that it's really REALLY bad at animating any object that is not pre-rigged with morphs (the surface of an ocean, exhaust from a rocket-ship, even hair). You can sometimes work around these, but sometimes it's utterly impossible. Also Poser's hair system is pretty basic, and it has no liquids or particles.

    However, you could do the bulk of your animation (figures moving and interacting) using Poser's pretty reasonable animation framework, then import your 3/4 finished animation into a modelling program and finish there. I use 3DS Max, so I don't know how Blender imports animation.
    Learn Poser first. It might do everything you need.



  • One option is to render out a base figure animation in Poser, and import the finished video into Blender. In Blender one can composite additional effects over the video; like particles or liquids if need be. Blender has a great compositor.

    Another option is to export poser animations as Collada files, and import those into Blender.



  • There are definitely limitations to Poser's animation, but until you hit them, there's no point moving to another system that will take 5 times as long to learn. The greatest limitation in Poser is that it's really REALLY bad at animating any object that is not pre-rigged with morphs (the surface of an ocean, exhaust from a rocket-ship, even hair). You can sometimes work around these, but sometimes it's utterly impossible. Also Poser's hair system is pretty basic, and it has no liquids or particles.

    ... and no animated metaballs either!



  • @mechanaut said in Needing help with Which software should I buy? Thank you:

    One option is to render out a base figure animation in Poser, and import the finished video into Blender. In Blender one can composite additional effects over the video; like particles or liquids if need be. Blender has a great compositor.

    Another option is to export poser animations as Collada files, and import those into Blender.

    A question around this, matb... I know very little of video formats and compositing...

    The biggest limitation that I always imaged with generating a movie in Poser and compositing in Blender is that the movie is 2D, so you have no 3D depth. Therefore, I imagine you can add effects in Blender as a layer, and that works ok for effects that go on top of the movie (like smoke in front of the toon), or if use some rotoscoping to add the effect with a mask (like rain behind, or if you're adding a background).

    But, if you add effects like snow that can go both in front and in the back of the figure, and you need to have depth to it (like the snow becomes smaller and falls slower with distance), then I suspect it becomes really complicated, because all pixels in the movie from Blender look exacty the same, that is, are at the same distance from the viewer.

    So, here's the question.. is there a video format in Poser that preserves distance from the camera (or z-depth) for each pixel, so that you can use that when compositing in Blender, so that the Blender effect can be around the toon -- as opposed as being all in the front or all in a mask behind?


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to Graphics Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.