Content Creation For Poser



  • I've just completed a new category for my directory on finding content creation software. But one thing I used to hear quite a bit was that it was easier to make things for Genesis and Daz Studio than it was for Poser. So I'm curious to know, what could SM do to develop an easier path to content creation for Poser?

    What do you wish would change about the current path?



  • I'd like to know how it could possibly be easier? The rigging or morphs part of the equation? I don't know because I don't do the DS or Genesis thing.



  • @rokketman You're exactly right rokket!

    In the past, there was a lot of the rigging process we had to go outside Poser to complete. Starting with PP12 and into PP11, those requirements are fewer and further between.



  • That simple. They need to focus the program around a pair of figures and don't worry about outside vendors trying to get the same results. If you do the same thing day and day out it becomes mussel memory. So if you look at Genesis how much do they change in size and shape from version to version? This is at the default no morphs etc. So if you have already made a shirt for G2 and G3, G8 are the same size & shape how hard is it to transfer the rigging for each new G to the basic object? Re-rig Re-texture and you have a new full price product, little to no modeling required.



  • Let me ask another question, then. Which is better to rig a NEW outfit with, the Setup Room or the Fitting Room? For that matter, CAN you even rig a new outfit in the Fitting Room? Is there a tutorial somewhere to show you how to do that?


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @eclark1849
    Yes you can rig a new outfit in the Fitting Room.

    What I usually do is assign groups in my modeler. I import the grouped OBJ into Poser and then take the figure and the grouped clothing OBJ into the fitting room. I don't do any fitting, since it's already modeled and grouped around the figure I want to conform it to.

    Then, in the Fitting Room, I just click the Create Figure button. DO NOT add the morphs yet, DO NOT auto group. ONLY copy the skeleton over. Then return to the Pose Room.

    This next part is important. Save the new clothing CR2 to the library. When you save the CR2, Poser creates a new OBJ, and the CR2 will point to that OBJ file that it places in the characters folder. But note that this OBJ will be split apart at the seams and probably also asymmetrical, and you don't want that. Replace that split apart OBJ with the good one that you originally imported (since it's not split apart).

    As an added note, I always save my OBJ file in the Geometries folder, to prevent it from being overwritten in the Characters folder while working on the clothing. In that case, I edit the saved CR2 to point to the OBJ in the Geometries folder.

    After you do that, load the new CR2 back into Poser and conform it to your figure. At that point you can tweak the weight maps if needed, add the morphs, etc. When you save the updated version, save it under the same name as the one already in the library, and it SHOULD continue to use your good OBJ file.

    Hope that all makes sense.

    As to your original question, if the clothing doesn't have any extra bones (like skirt posing bones, etc), I usually use the Fitting Room to rig. If I have to add other bones for posing the clothing, I use the Setup Room to rig.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Hi Dee, that's exactly how I would have answered. Good Job !

    Only difference is that I keep my cr2 and "the correctly welded" obj together in a single folder together with the textures of the outfit.

    My "spare" obj is always in a Blender file in case of....

    PS : I always use the fitting room to create "new" or "reworked" clothing.
    I hardly ever use the setup room for clothing, but it is required for rigged props, or anything else not "human" figure related..



  • @Deecey Makes sense except for why the OBJ is split apart. In the Setup Room I get it. the bones need to bend at the joints, etc. but i thought that wasn't needed in the Fitting Room.



  • @eclark1849 I've had this free Fitting Room tutorial available for a couple of years.
    https://www.dana-anderson.com/Vendor3D/VendorProductView.aspx?pid=46


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @eclark1849
    Bones are necessary for conforming clothing as well. The Fitting Room and the Setup Room both add bones. Fitting Room copies them from the underlying figure, Setup room does that plus allows you to create bones as well.



  • @vilters & @Deecey You have both said that Poser does not create a welded object when saving a figure out. Which appears to be true. However in some tests I created a simple object using notepad and it consists of vertexes and faces. When I imported the object and used the grouping tools in Poser to create the bones and saved the figure back out it broke the figure into multiple segments and added extra vertexes. Bringing that figure back in and exporting as a Wavefront object and checking the first three options A) Weld body part seams B) As morph Target and C) Include body part names in polygon an groups creates an Object file that has all the same number of vertexes and faces in the same order as the object file I made it from.

    So my question is do you have an example of where Poser will not create a properly welded object from an figure that is exported in the fashion I said above? The way I see it, it should be easy enough for the Programmers to add the option to create a figure using the export options as I listed.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @richard60
    Just about to head to bed, but I did run this test.

    1. Load a figure that has a good selection of morphs into a scene.
    2. Dial in some morphs to create a custom figure.
    3. Export the morphed character out, using your recommended settings.
    4. Zero the morphs out in the figure in the scene.
    5. Now load your exported OBJ in as a morph target. When I did this, the morph exploded, which means the vertex order changed.

    After that, I opened the exported OBJ in Modo. The vertex count of the two figures is indeed the same, but the vertex order is definitely changed. I tried using it as a vertex morph in Modo and it exploded there as well.



  • My problem is that using rigging, bones, everything, makes terrible people. Take a look at a human. I mean, REALLY look. Sure, we have bones, but we RARELY see them. What you see is an elastic covering over top of something that moves. In Poser terms, the cover is a cloth room object that is shrunk onto a moving frame. Clothes are just an outer layer of skin that doesn't work as well. Until Poser flips the paradigm, outer is more important than inner, then the people will continue to be unrealistic (create a vacuum).



  • What's really sad is that this doll (Stretch Armstrong) is more realistic than a Poser figure!

    0_1510411881299_elastic.jpg



  • @tburzio It's more real. but seriously, that's where the realism stops... dead.



  • @tburzio The only time that matters is when you're doing nudes or nearly nude. Explain why muscle movement is important when hidden by clothing?

    So, yeah, for the 3D porn crowd, you might want that kind of figure, but for the rest of us it's just going to get covered up in clothing.



  • @Glitterati3D Totally false. The most egregious error is between the biceps and the forearm, which is almost ALWAYS visible. In most models you only get a uniceps, which you can see in the awful Hulk Avenger movie character. Then there's the neck/back interface, where the skin "breaks" all the time. Oddly enough, the genitals aren't a problem because they do not span rigging.



  • @eclark1849 It is an example of correctly done skin spanning of joints, nothing more.



  • @tburzio I was not talking about genitals. I was talking about your render in another thread. The one where the guy is wearing a shirt with boob socks, and creases where is abdomen muscles crease. Clothes don't fit like that. Puuuuuuuuuulease, all that does is make us ALL look ridiculous.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @tburzio said in Content Creation For Poser:

    My problem is that using rigging, bones, everything, makes terrible people. Take a look at a human. I mean, REALLY look. Sure, we have bones, but we RARELY see them. What you see is an elastic covering over top of something that moves. In Poser terms, the cover is a cloth room object that is shrunk onto a moving frame. Clothes are just an outer layer of skin that doesn't work as well. Until Poser flips the paradigm, outer is more important than inner, then the people will continue to be unrealistic (create a vacuum).

    If you mean things like the folded joint in the elbows in older figures, that can be fixed with weight maps and bulge maps, and a jcm if necessary.


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