I don't get it... why SM's Poser gallery highlights water/fire effects?



  • One has ZERO water and fire effects in Poser, yet SM's first set of artwork in Poser gallery gives the impression you can do water effects with it; I cite (all links to SM's gallery):

    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#3

    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#11

    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#13

    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#14

    So 4 out of first 14 artwork have water/fire, or about 1/3. Then of course the follow up artwork has zero (I looked at the next 50 and didn't find any), because Poser cannot do that.

    Yet, a newcomer looking at the galleries from the beginning will have the impression you can make wonderful water effects.

    Hmmmm....


  • Poser Ambassadors

    I've seen a number of water and fire effects created in Poser. I can't begin to explain to you how at the moment as I'm pretty craptastic in the material room, but others are not.

    Nerd3D has a couple tools available over at hivewire that help with water and fire effects. Some updating to Superfly materials would make them a lot better.



  • @fbs7 Hmmmm, I don't know. The renders with "fire" look like they could very well be postworked. I'm thinking Ron's Brushes over at DAZ3D could easily have done those.

    As far as No. 3, the first one you linked to, that was created with ClipStudio, or so it states in the bottom right-hand corner. Why it's being displayed in a Poser gallery, I have no idea.

    As far as the last one you linked to, that looks more like a SuperFly glass shader was applied to a reworked face mesh.

    Of course, I've been using Poser for some time, so I know what can be done with SF shaders and postwork. Someone new to 3D/Poser, probably won't think of such options.



  • Consider this one, number #31 in the gallery:

    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#31

    How gorgeous! That's beautifully done, and very clearly displays the tool's capabilities. If one purchases the model and the props, and have the instructions for mat setup, lights and rendering, then I very much believe that one can produce right away from Poser, maybe with some little post work.

    But that's tucked away in #31; the first 20 or so artwork in the gallery are a mixed bag where some display what can be done in Poser, while others seem to be display what can be done in Blender (or whatever) and have Poser at some minor step in the process.

    I mean, if a newcomer asks "Hey, how can I do this in Poser??":

    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#14

    then I'd have to say "Dude, you can't, most of the work for that was done in Blender/Maya/whatever else..."



  • As far as No. 3, the first one you linked to, that was created with ClipStudio, or so it states in the bottom right-hand corner. Why it's being displayed in a Poser gallery, I have no idea.

    Hmm... maybe you're right... some people can do wonders with 2D painters, although for me it very much looks like a 3D rendering of water simulation, so I suspected that Poser was involved at some step of that artwork, maybe in the final rendering...


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @fbs7 said in I don't get it... why SM's Poser gallery highlights water/fire effects?:

    Consider this one, number #31 in the gallery:

    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#31

    How gorgeous! That's beautifully done, and very clearly displays the tool's capabilities. If one purchases the model and the props, and have the instructions for mat setup, lights and rendering, then I very much believe that one can produce right away from Poser, maybe with some little post work.

    But that's tucked away in #31; the first 20 or so artwork in the gallery are a mixed bag where some display what can be done in Poser, while others seem to be display what can be done in Blender (or whatever) and have Poser at some minor step in the process.

    I mean, if a newcomer asks "Hey, how can I do this in Poser??":

    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#14

    then I'd have to say "Dude, you can't, most of the work for that was done in Blender/Maya/whatever else..."

    I use photoshop to change textures and sometimes to do postwork, I use Zbrush to adjust or create morphs, I use VWD to do cloth simulations, I use OpenVDB to create volumetric effects like water, smoke, clouds and I use Octane to render it. The main application I use however is Poser - to design the scene, to pose the characters, to give them expressions, to give them their look with texturing, to get the camera angles and to act as the main application which I can save all this.
    So for me, it is a Poser image.



  • @wimvdb You can create all those effects in Blender and render them in Poser using Cycles. And the one that looks like a face isn't actually a water effect, but a sculpted mesh. Which, once again, could have been rendered in either Cycles or Superfly.



  • @fbs7 when you are really good you paint in the hair using photoshop. The original image probably rendered in PP2012 and used V4 and a catsuit that Daz sells. The point is that you arn't limited to raw renders.
    http://my.smithmicro.com/poser-photo-gallery.html#15



  • Well, it's good to know that people don't have a problem with SM giving the impression you can do water and fire in Poser when Poser has no water or fire.

    I guess I'm just getting old.



  • @fbs7 The thing that sets me off is when I see a render and there is no artist info, or the artist is real secretive on his/her techniques. If I see an image that looks better than what I'm doing I want to know how to do that. If SM or Daz (see my thread DS or BS) puts out some amazing images made with their software they should be making tutorials on how to achieve that look.



  • @fbs7 said in I don't get it... why SM's Poser gallery highlights water/fire effects?:

    Well, it's good to know that people don't have a problem with SM giving the impression you can do water and fire in Poser when Poser has no water or fire.

    I guess I'm just getting old.

    People have been photoshopping or postworking cgi pictures for years. In Poser, Blender, Studio, Maya, Lightwave, Pixar, etc. Blender guru has a tutorial on showing how to model rain streaks on glass and yes, Blender does have fluid sims.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    This is what the frontpage of the gallery says:

    Poser Photo Gallery

    Thousands of artists use Poser and other design tools to create incredible art. Whether you're just indulging a hobby or you need something for a professional project, Poser and Poser content give you a wide range of characters to start from. Then it's up to you to make something great.

    Spend some time in our gallery of featured artists who are at the top of their game to get some inspiration.

    Submit Your Latest Poser Artwork Here



  • I think I would feel better if the gallery encouraged people that use other softwares to give credit to them when posting in a Poser gallery.

    After all, we're not talking about an artist gallery here... this is a product gallery in the official page of the vendor of a product. So when an art has a substantial contribution from another software, but that goes unspoken and unknown, then it's easy to mistake that as being part of the product.

    There are some principles that are widely known, like you need a 2D painter in order to paint a texture, and you need a 2D image editor to add post effects. So there's no much chance one would mistake a 3D software as Poser as having some kind of 2D functionality.

    But then many 3D softwares have smoke/water/fire effects, it's a very common thing nowadays... so when Poser has 30% of the top of its gallery with smoke/water/fire effects done in other softwares, and that goes unspoken, then that's easy to think that there's some deliberate muteness about that.

    But then again I may just be getting old.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Poser doesn't have a particle system, but it does have the ability to create smoke, water, fire and fog with material settings and various 3rd party tools people have made for Poser, like the ones by nerd3d I mentioned earlier. Some of those images probably were postworked but without listing credits for the various images it's anyone's guess what was actually used. But as long as Poser was used in the image then I think it's fair to post in the gallery as an example of what could be done.



  • Oh I already see the new promo by "Avtovaz":

    (Imagine photo of interiour of latest RollsRoyce here, can't post because of copywrong):

    Buy the new luxury LADA L2100! The ultimate in today's automobile design!
    [...]blah blah[..]

    On the last page of the catalogue you get this (if you use a magnifying glass to discover the tiny text):

    N.B.:
    Extras like dashboard, instruments, seats, steering wheel, leather and wood outfit, plush carpets and "slightly" modified chassis are provided by third party provider in Coventry, GB and may vary from standard configuration.
    Photos made with "CANON" cameras.
    Overall promo design by Ogilvy & Mather, USA.
    Printed in Malaysia



  • Above was just an example of "what could be done", if only... :)
    So is that LADA still "Made in Togliattigrad"? Even "Made in Russia?

    Sorry, I don't want to ridicule any of you fine guys and girls here.
    Most of your opinions are indeed valid points, depending on one's own perspective.
    So please pardon that I just was in an odd mood and my tongue somehow got stuck in my cheek :D

    -> Remains the Question:
    What still makes it a real LADA if most parts aren't made by LADA?

    • OK, the ignition keys still are ;)

    (thinking hard...) Karina


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @karina said in I don't get it... why SM's Poser gallery highlights water/fire effects?:

    What makes it a LADA if most parts aren't made by LADA?

    Well, if you really get technical ... most of the content you actually USE in Poser was made in other software. ;-)


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @Deecey lol. was just gonna say the same thing.



  • That may be true - I really don't know.

    The point I wanted to make is:

    Is it still a Poser render if most of it is made with other software?

    (yes my analogy was terribly long-winded - sorry for that!)

    But in the end, my opinion is:
    Don't promote renders which display something which you can't achieve in Poser!
    Or at least tell people that they need this and that program to get the same results.
    Otherwise you'll get disappointed customers who feel cheated with wrong promises!

    K


  • Poser Ambassadors

    @AmbientShade

    Exactly!

    Karina ...

    I can't open the links in the first post, so I can't comment on whether or not I consider them to be "Poser Renders." For some reason the links aren't resolving. But I'm assuming, given the URL, that they are gallery images that were submitted by Poser users. In that case, there are a wide variety of users, some that use other tools in addition to Poser to create their art.

    But, here's my humble opinion. Poser is a tool. Some people prefer to do it all in Poser, others don't. Actually the original purpose of Poser was to use as a human reference for traditional art, for those who didn't have a live model to sketch from.

    If an image is rendered in other software, I wouldn't consider it to be a Poser RENDER. But if you render something in Poser and then add some postwork effects in other software, yes, it's still a Poser RENDER.

    If it uses Poser content, Poser is still one of the tools used to create the image. So whether or not you classify that as a Poser image is up to you.

    But when you are using Poser to assemble content that was modeled in 3DS Max or Cinema 4D, rigged in Poser, textured in Photoshop or Quixel Suite or Substance Painter, and morphs created in ZBrush, you can't really say it's entirely a Poser image. 8-)

    AHA. The links are working now ... and the paragraphs above each image pretty much say what I've already said:

    "Thousands of artists use Poser and other design tools to create incredible art. Whether you're just indulging a hobby or you need something for a professional project, Poser and Poser content give you a wide range of characters to start from. Then it's up to you to make something great.

    Spend some time in our gallery of featured artists who are at the top of their game to get some inspiration."


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to Graphics Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.