Regarding draping clothes



  • In the thread about the cloth room, someone mentioned setting the figure's pose on the last frame. It's not the first time I've seen that. Why put the pose there? Wouldn't the figure's final pose be better in the middle of the simulation so the cloth has time to settle? Most of my simulations, when the figure first stops moving, the cloth is still flying and it takes 15 to 30 more frames for it to hang.



  • @redphantom I've done that, though not in the middle. Usually, if I'm running a 30-frame sim, I'll set the final pose in frame 20, and use the last 10 frames for the clothing to settle.

    I find it all depends on how much it needs to sim. I don't model clothing much, but have modeled a couple of dresses this year, but neither are very flare, so don't really need more than 4 or 5 frames to settle, if that much. I make them dynamic, because I have yet to learn how to rig and weight map clothing.



  • @redphantom

    I agree that it's better to put the final pose in the middle, and then allow additional frames for it to settle down. Especially if the pose turns the figure in any way so that it's no longer facing forward. Especially for long dresses and such you'd need to allow the dress to stop "spinning" and settle out.

    BTW, I apologize for my blunders about the dynamic groups over there. I've been cramming so much new stuff and new software and techniques into my brain lately that I can't think straight. I think I need a break. LMAO



  • For me it depends on what I am trying to achieve with the simulation. Sometimes I want the flyaway look, sometimes I want it to settle...


  • Poser Ambassadors

    I never put the pose in the last frame. Sometimes in frame 15 from 30, sometimes in 20 from 30 but never in the end.



  • @Deecey said in Regarding draping clothes:

    @redphantom

    I agree that it's better to put the final pose in the middle, and then allow additional frames for it to settle down. Especially if the pose turns the figure in any way so that it's no longer facing forward. Especially for long dresses and such you'd need to allow the dress to stop "spinning" and settle out.

    Sometimes you want the dress to appear to be spinning, say for an action shot: this applies to dynamic jewellery in particular. In cases like these I set the simulation to continue running after the final pose, and then run through the frames to see which one I like best. Often, just a few frames after the final one gives the most dynamic effect (pun intended!).

    0_1529054985504_Merry whirls.jpg
    On the other hand, tight clothing rarely needs any settling time, and then having the final pose at the end offers the quickest and simplest simulation.



  • I do agree that sometimes you want the cloth to have the look of movement and putting it at the end works best then. I was referring to general instructions for still figures.

    Deecey, not a big deal. What I posted I figured it was something a lot of people may not realize. It was by accident that I learned about clothifying multiple things in the same simulation.



  • @redphantom You can clothify more than one item in a single simulation?

    Do tell...



  • @rokketman yes, you can. Set up your simulation the same way you usually do. After you've told poser what to clothify, click clothify again and add a second item. They will share collision items. It's good for draping parts of a conformer, like sleeves and skirt of a dress. I've never tried it with layered clothing to know the will collide with each other well.



  • @redphantom
    That is interesting!



  • @redphantom I am not on my machine right now, but later today I am going to give this a try and see what I can come up with. Thanks!



  • I think I was the one to say "use the last frame" ... Which I usually do, but yes, of course it depends on what you want in the final image. Most of the time, it is fine, though. And easy :)


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