just a comment about 3rd party asset stores



  • I just noticed - and I have to give kudos to DAZ3D - that Poser 3rd-party content items I bought from RuntimeDNA some time ago, are now available at DAZ3D under my account. Of course, not all RDNA vendors have moved across to DAZ3D, with the latter's acquisition of RDNA's business. But I am pleasantly surprised that what can be made available under my account, has been.



  • Yeah, nice one. RDNA items are in my product library, and show up as 'purchased' on the store page. That should help to stop me buying the same thing twice. ;)



  • I guess it's a sign of the success of RDNA's business that DAZ bought them out, but I'm always a little saddened when I see major businesses merging, reducing variety and competition. DAZ seems to be much more expensive than other vendors, and I'm not keen on their content install system.



  • @matb I only use the DAZ Install Manager (DIM) to download from my account. I have never used it to install, and it's not necessary to do so.

    Of course, downloading with DIM did let me know my RDNA purchases were slowly but surely showing up in my DAZ account.



  • @matb said in just a comment about 3rd party asset stores:

    I guess it's a sign of the success of RDNA's business that DAZ bought them out

    In my opinion, it's not a profits or investment move, but a "market share" strategy move.

    but I'm always a little saddened when I see major businesses merging, reducing variety and competition. DAZ seems to be much more expensive than other vendors, and I'm not keen on their content install system.

    IMO, they're somewhat following guerilla-marketing principles aimed primarily at their steady user base. (Entirely legitimate "exploitation", by the way.) They use a "discount sales" combination profit/marketing model. (See "J.C. Penny" department stores, especially before their last, badly chosen, strategic marketing move and their much safer return to the discount-sales model.)

    What this means is simple - Only impulse-buyers, influenced by heavy product marketing campaigns, buy at list or at only very low discounts. Discriminating buyers buy at deep discounts and are more likely to buy multiple items. First-run items get intro/soft discounts and either never or only rarely get anything near a deep discount price. Therefore - Most items are always listed higher than they actually have median sale's figures for to justify that price. (More volume purchased at lower prices.)

    There is also a "buyer's club" inducement, with popular items getting a tiered discount purchase, the profits being made up by "membership fees."

    IOW - DAZ has been doing things "very right" from a general business and marketing standpoint. However, they are somewhat going very much overboard on guerrilla marketing tactics and are incorporating those into their overall strategic business model and technical/operations model instead of restraining these schemes to their sales and marketing model, where they belong, while working to improve the overall market in their favor, preferably through innovation, which can make things easier when the "unexpected" happens. IMO, this never works well in the long term and results in an echo-chamber effect in long-term planning which tends to encounter more restrictions as time/planning progresses. (Makes it difficult to maneuver outside of one's "plan" since other options haven't been given room to grow and one's choices begin to be limited to encouraging choices within a limited, artificially constructed, focus.)

    And, yes... I've been waiting to comment on this for a long time. :)

    TLDR Version: Never buy anything unless it's on sale. ;)

    PS - I have nothing bad to say about them at all from a practical business standpoint and have no true knowledge of their internal policies, but can only glean what I can assume from their visible business practices and entirely based on my own experience and knowledge. :)



  • @morkonan

    I have absolutely knowledge when it comes to business, but you've perfectly described my totally scattered ideas and feelings about this...
    Thanks ~smile~



  • @morkonan A fascinating perspective morkonan, however, I wonder if this tactic actually works against them? Because DAZ content is so expensive, although their quality is dependably extremely high, I'm always reticent to buy from them unless I am desperate. Also, thinking now of the Steam games platform, I simply defer ALL buying decisions until items are at least 75% off. This is dreadful for PUBLISHER'S cashflow, and means that items that most NEED a reinjection of cash to offset development time are the last to get it from the growing base of savvy purchasers.

    I also think that DAZ suffers another risk that steam shares. There is so much bargain priced competition (or in the case of steam, early release, free to play content), to say nothing of pirate content, that their high price model actively drives people away. I am very loyal to DAZ 3D, and sign up to all their stuff, but I am very rarely aware of sales because I simply don't sign in often enough.

    I am particularly fascinated by one thing you said:

    they are somewhat going very much overboard on guerrilla marketing tactics and are incorporating those into their overall strategic business model and technical/operations model instead of restraining these schemes to their sales and marketing model,

    Can you give an example of what you mean by this?


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