Ladies and Gentlemen ...



  • !!! THE ANDIES !!!

    0_1538420679287_the_andies_ap.jpg



  • @posebaker very well done.
    Would you care to tell how do you setup the glass shader and what rendersettings you used?



  • @marco

    you can't do it in Poser
    it's a native Cinema 4D custom shader

    Cycles in Poser is not the same like Blender or Cycles 4D - and even in Blender Cycles or Cycles 4D you can't get that shader



  • @posebaker Yes, you can. Both with real caustics and fake ones. Well, to be accurate, you can do dispersion with shaders in Cycles. I don't know if you could say it's exactly the same, but I wouldn't say that about any shader in different renderers.



  • I sense a challenge coming on...



  • This is a cycles material in Superfly. I know it needs some improvement, but it just shows that you can do this in Poser...
    0_1538452379975_andy glass.png



  • @rokketman

    sounds good
    will be following the renders to come :)



  • @posebaker Glass in Cycles for Blender and Poser only takes one node. The Glass Shader. Except for chrome, I think it's the easiest shader to make.



  • @eclark1849 uhhh, not if you want actual simulated dispersion, you have to apply different IOR to different colour bands for dispersion, so red, green and blue glass nodes are a minimum, then, if you want realistic absorption, that's at least another node, and more for scattering effects if there are any impurities.

    A lot can be done to fool the eye with one node, but a side by side comparison of a photo with a render of a scene simulating that photo throws up all manner of discrepancies.



  • @anomalaus You don't need all that to get glass. Just if you want different characteristics of different glass.



  • 0_1538492489202_8bf08d24-fdec-40c2-9687-4a453e5be6d8-image.png
    Using BB's gem shader (which I may well have hooked up wrong ... but it looks pretty glassy to me)



  • @eclark1849 as far as I can see, every smooth, transparent, finite-thickness, curved surface material with a refractive index greater than one, will exhibit dispersion and chromatic aberration in the real world, unless it has specific properties which counteract that. The GlassBsdf shader by itself does not provide the means to render dispersion, hence, you don't "get glass", you get a simplified version which refracts (all wavelengths identically) and reflects and diffuses (if you apply roughness), but isn't true to real world glass, which you are correct to point out comes in infinite variations.

    Now, all of that said, given a colourful background to reflect and refract, if you don't have specific lighting and surfaces external to the "glass" which might receive and highlight the existence of refracted rainbows (dispersion) and caustics, it's very likely that at first glance, one will see and say, "that looks like glass", and "I'm happy with that". Not a problem.

    I know I'm quibbling over language and usage [because those are things important to me], but it's difficult enough to be understood and not misunderstood when we share a common language, let alone those reading this forum who have to interpret what's said. Adding all of the extra features on top of GlassBsdf gets closer to what you'll see on your kitchen countertop. Leaving them out, and just using GlassBsdf may not give you a less than believable render, in the right circumstances, but a blanket statement saying "you don't need ..." departs from what the posted image at the top of this topic is (pretty obviously, though that might be open to debate, given it's not a scene we can replicate and play with ourselves directly in Poser) demonstrating: Glass with dispersion.

    @trekkiegrrrl 's render is doing a good job, though, unfortunately, as with my own renders, it will take a lot more samples to give the same level of clarity that the C4D render appears to. Even that render has some DOF adjustments I'd like to see, to better judge how well the dispersion is being rendered. The shoulder of the Andy on the left also exhibits what might be C4D's equivalent of SuperFly "fireflies", though that's harder to judge.



  • @anomalaus said in Ladies and Gentlemen ...:

    @eclark1849 as far as I can see, every smooth, transparent, finite-thickness, curved surface material with a refractive index greater than one, will exhibit dispersion and chromatic aberration in the real world, unless it has specific properties which counteract that. The GlassBsdf shader by itself does not provide the means to render dispersion, hence, you don't "get glass", you get a simplified version which refracts (all wavelengths identically) and reflects and diffuses (if you apply roughness), but isn't true to real world glass, which you are correct to point out comes in infinite variations.

    Now, all of that said, given a colourful background to reflect and refract, if you don't have specific lighting and surfaces external to the "glass" which might receive and highlight the existence of refracted rainbows (dispersion) and caustics, it's very likely that at first glance, one will see and say, "that looks like glass", and "I'm happy with that". Not a problem.

    I know I'm quibbling over language and usage [because those are things important to me], but it's difficult enough to be understood and not misunderstood when we share a common language, let alone those reading this forum who have to interpret what's said. Adding all of the extra features on top of GlassBsdf gets closer to what you'll see on your kitchen countertop. Leaving them out, and just using GlassBsdf may not give you a less than believable render, in the right circumstances, but a blanket statement saying "you don't need ..." departs from what the posted image at the top of this topic is (pretty obviously, though that might be open to debate, given it's not a scene we can replicate and play with ourselves directly in Poser) demonstrating: Glass with dispersion.

    @trekkiegrrrl 's render is doing a good job, though, unfortunately, as with my own renders, it will take a lot more samples to give the same level of clarity that the C4D render appears to. Even that render has some DOF adjustments I'd like to see, to better judge how well the dispersion is being rendered. The shoulder of the Andy on the left also exhibits what might be C4D's equivalent of SuperFly "fireflies", though that's harder to judge.

    Yes, this one was with 35 samples. And I
    m missing the rainbows, though those MAY be related to the lighting used. (EZ Dome with an EZ sun, but faint)

    At work now, but I'll try it in other lighting conditions and see. I KNOW this shader can do the rainbows, coz I've seen it. So .. I'll have to experiment further :)



  • if you are interested
    here is the original Cinema 4D file with all assets

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/bjsidv6t1sl3g31/The Andies.zip?dl=0



  • 0_1538501833933_Dispersion.png



  • @me195

    looks great so far
    you can fix the black areas when you set the render to progressive refinement (if not done already and glossy filtering to 0.5)
    the transparency is set by default at 16 if I recall correctly which is a bit high to be honest; 8 will do



  • @posebaker The black areas are a reflection of the curtain in the hotel room where the hdri was taken. It was a poor choice for an hdri on my part.



  • @me195

    not necessarily a bad choice; see what it looks like with the HDRI as background I'm sure you'll change your mind :)
    I usually blur the HDRIs for things like that to get a calmer scenery
    give it a try



  • @posebaker Thank you, I will definitely give it a try. Also thank you for the glossy filter setting. That makes it look a whole lot better.



  • @posebaker Rendered using your suggested settings. You sure do know your glass. Thank you. Your feedback is greatly appreciated.
    0_1538509433673_Dispersion2.png