Quick question for the British speaking: "Meter" or "Metre"?



  • Sorry, but English isn't my native language;
    we use "метр" universally so I just stumbled over this issue today when working on a prop that can be scaled by X times "метры"

    Question is, how should I label the dial:

    • "Size + x Metres"?
    • "Size + x Meters"?

    Preferably in "The Queen's English" please ;o)

    Thank you!

    Karina


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  • @Ghostman, Thank you for this link!

    It helped me a LOT to learn about differences in British and American spelling of words (and it was quite entertaining to read as well!)

    So, problem solved: it will be "metres".

    K


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    @karina yeah i read it my self the other week and found it quite entertaining . lol
    personally i'm more into proper english since thats what we learn in school here in sweden.



  • @karina Metre



  • @karina Here in the US, of course, we use Meters, BUT, for those of us who hang out on international forums, we're used to seeing the British spelling of words all the time.

    In fact, I was very friendly with one of the gals at the firm I worked at for many years who was English, and ever since I've been spelling the color "grey", and not "gray". At first my friends all thought it was a typo, or I just didn't know how to spell it, but when I explained that's the British English language spelling, they got used to it, and didn't try to correct me any more.

    Why I only stuck with that, I'm not sure, but I think it's because I've been doing 2D graphics work for so long, colors (or colours) was just something that stuck with me.



  • @miss-b that word's the hardest of all to infer a "correct" spelling for, since there are as many folks who have "Gray" as a surname, (think Gray's "Elegy in a country churchyard" or Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray") as there are those who use "Grey" (think Earl Grey, of Oil of Bergamot flavoured tea fame). No doubt many PhDs have been earned through that debate.

    To be entirely fair, one could just strictly alternate the spellings at every appearance, to (virtually) guarantee being wrong all the time. ;-)



  • @anomalaus True, but when it comes to proper names (of people or consumer products), then I spell it the way it should be spelled, be it "a" or "e".

    It's just the color grey I always spell with an "e". ~smile~



  • @miss-b Exactly, and if your tea or coffee is grey, ask for a fresh cup!

    I speak from practical experience here. Long before home barista machines were a thing, but percolators were it, I found some old coffee beans that were not obviously mouldy, and still smelled all right, and decided to grind them up in what was available at the time, an old, hand cranked grinder/sausage maker. Unfortunately, the grinder was so past its "use by" that it literally ground itself along with the coffee beans. The resulting grounds were distinctly grey, which once brewed, exhibited a distinctly metallic aroma which none were willing to risk their health on. ;-)



  • @anomalaus Oh, I wouldn't have wanted it either. I never ground my own coffee back in the percolator days, so never had an experience like that, though I have an old machine of that sort that I used to use to finely cutup cabbage and other ingredients for home made cold slaw.

    I haven't used it in so long, you've got me wondering if it's "passed" it's usage date.



  • I would just leave it at METP.

    Teach those English suc ... eh ... speakers a real language, Ukranian.



  • @darthj though having sung in a Ukrainian Orthodox Church choir, both with English transliteration and directly reading the Cyrillic script, (having learned the Greek alphabet in childhood from the back of a science dictionary, it was a relatively small step to learn the additional characters) I would certainly recognise "Отче наш" as "Our Father", but would never claim to understand the spoken or written language.

    Given enough time to listen, I might be able to distinguish between the hard G of Russian, from the soft of Ukrainian, but otherwise, it might as well be Phoenician ;-)



  • @miss-b said in Quick question for the British speaking: "Meter" or "Metre"?:

    @anomalaus True, but when it comes to proper names (of people or consumer products), then I spell it the way it should be spelled, be it "a" or "e".

    It's just the color grey I always spell with an "e". ~smile~

    Surely you must mean colour if you are spelling grey correctly! 😉



  • @raven said in Quick question for the British speaking: "Meter" or "Metre"?:

    @miss-b said in Quick question for the British speaking: "Meter" or "Metre"?:

    @anomalaus True, but when it comes to proper names (of people or consumer products), then I spell it the way it should be spelled, be it "a" or "e".

    It's just the color grey I always spell with an "e". ~smile~

    Surely you must mean colour if you are spelling grey correctly! 😉

    Why not avoid the problem(s) entirely - how about the pale black shade?
    Or perhaps the dark white tint...



  • Or to stay strictly "Poserite", just say the gal wore a #7E7E7E dyed dress.
    And it's even more precise than "grey/gray"!

    B.t.w., is "grey" a colour at all, or just a brightness value of white?
    ;oD
    K


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    @karina said in Quick question for the British speaking: "Meter" or "Metre"?:

    Or to stay strictly "Poserite", just say the gal wore a #7E7E7E dyed dress.
    And it's even more precise than "grey/gray"!

    B.t.w., is "grey" a colour at all, or just a brightness value of white?
    ;oD
    K

    Or maybe just a lighter shade of black. ;)



  • @karina Interesting comment, as I was always taught that black and white were not colors, because if you turn up any color in the spectrum high enough you'll get white, and turn it down low enough, you'll wind up with black, or pretty darn close to true white (#FFFFFF) or true black (#000000). ~wink~



  • @ghostman said in [Quick question for the British speaking: > Or maybe just a lighter shade of black. ;)

    Or a darker shade of white. ~grin~



  • @miss-b
    or a whiter shade of pale ?

    ?



  • ...or a blacker shade of dark ?