Importing a photograph.



  • I would like to import a photograph of someone as a background to marry up the picture with a POSER cartoon character but I don't yet know how to do that. Could someone please advise.
    Thank you very much.



  • File menu, import, background picture.
    You must make the GROUND prop invisible to see it once imported


  • Poser Ambassadors

    The built-in background has its uses, but also some limitations. It is the quickest method but offers no options to adjust.

    Another approach is to load a prop upon which you display the desired background image. This is extra work but offers advantages:

    • You can easily pan and zoom (scale) the prop - can't do that with the background so easily
    • The background prop will provide reflections (both specular and diffuse) for other props you may place in front of it that help with the illusion of being in that environment. The built-in "background" isn't in the scene at all and doesn't influence the appearance of things in the scene.
    • The color and brightness of this background can be manipulated pretty easily using the prop's shader nodes

    Poser's "one sided square" (found in Primitives) is capable of serving here. Load the image into the ambient channel of the shader, turn off diffuse and specular, and scale and position it as you need to fill the camera's field of view.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    0_1549480566244_2d641696-a20d-418b-965d-eff442771f50-image.png


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Here I loaded two copies of the machine room image prop, one behind, one in front, and I set the front one to be very bright and invisible to the camera.

    I rendered without any lights in SuperFly. This is the result.

    0_1549481663839_MachineRoom.png


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Here was the setup
    0_1549481783303_fa50264b-c4a9-4693-b349-770531db178a-image.png


  • Poser Ambassadors

    0_1549482147591_MachineRoom2.png


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Shader for the background

    0_1549482234281_43e6acd8-ae8e-4f9e-ba31-0a5adeefef46-image.png


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Shader for the foreground (same but with boosted ambient value)
    0_1549482285890_915795b7-b51d-4603-9aa4-ebaeaca5e3b1-image.png



  • @j-naylor73 Thank you for taking the time to reply and advise, most appreciated.



  • @bagginsbill Thank you for such a detailed reply, very helpful. Not quite sure why the double image was/is required, not even sure how to access 'Image Map' or 'Poser Surface' but your comments have certainly given me something to work on. Most kind thank you.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    The double image isn't required. I am showing how the use of environmental lighting to match the background can be done. Environmental lighting is usually not seen directly by the camera (as most if it is out of the camera's view), but clearly influencing how the subject is lit.

    That influence of how the subject is lit, when poorly matched to the photo, is detectable by even inexperienced observers. Using another image to fill the "world" behind the camera makes a huge difference.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    The PoserSurface and Image_Map are the nodes that are actually implementing the material.

    You're probably only looking at the Simple view in the material room.

    Drop your image into Ambient in the Simple room, then switch to the Advanced material room and voila.


  • Poser Ambassadors

    Here's another couple examples using Andy again and the double image background and foreground.

    Look closely at Andy's colors. There were no changes to Andy between rendering the two images, yet he is totally different in color. The change is due to the unseen environment behind the camera, produced by using the same image twice.

    0_1549568570393_A1.png

    0_1549568576442_A2.png

    This is a very simple technique that produces stunning results. If you simply used a fixed light in these settings, you would not produce the right lighting. You could possibly do it with many lights and a lot of fiddling, or maybe with an IBL, but seriously why would you bother. That is what we used to do 10 years ago.